COLLISIONcollective

**************************************************************************************************************************************************
*                                                                                                                                                *
*                        For engineers that moonlight as artists and artists that moonlight as engineers                                         *
*                                                                                                                                                *
**************************************************************************************************************************************************
*                                                                                                                                                *
*   CCC    OOO    L      L     IIIII    SSS     IIIII    OOO    N    N                   l     l                      t      i                   *
*  C   C  O   O   L      L       I     S   S      I     O   O   NN   N                  ll    ll                      t                          *
*  C      O   O   L      L       I     S          I     O   O   N N  N    ccc     ooo    l     l     eee     ccc    ttttt    i    v   v    eee   *
*  C      O   O   L      L       I       S        I     O   O   N  N N   c   c   o   o   l     l    e   e   c   c     t      i    v   v   e   e  *
*  C      O   O   L      L       I         S      I     O   O   N   NN   c       o   o   l     l    eeeee   c         t      i    v   v   eeeee  *
*  C   C  O   O   L      L       I     S   S      I     O   O   N    N   c   c   o   o   l     l    e       c   c     t      i     v v    e      *
*   CCC    OOO    LLLLL  LLLLL IIIII    SSS     IIIII    OOO    N    N    ccc     ooo   lll   lll    eee     ccc      tt    iii     v      eee   *
*                                                                                                                                                *
**************************************************************************************************************************************************

hand.007

Laser Cut Sheet Acrylic, Wood, LEDs
2014
hand.007

This work is in my series of hands created by cutting sheets of acrylic (Plexiglas) and stacking them together. In this work the hands create a void which can be occupied by a small creature, and air holes are provided for ventilation.

See video

The Alchemist

Aluminum, wood, mirrored glass, Acrylic plastic, LEDs, Teflon/copper wire
2014
Artwork by collisi1

A geometrically perfect sphere of moving, glowing light is projected to appear to sit two feet outside a small cube atop a pedestal. The imaginary form, not unlike a hologram, churns and flows as the viewer approaches, like a burning star bursting with ever-changing solar flares. The sphere is an illusion created by what is inside the box, which is itself hard to discern. Like much of my work, this sculpture uses illusion, optic tricks, and a clever use of relatively simple materials to achieve an mesmerizing and otherworldly experience for my viewer.

See video

Tyvek Dolphin Lantern

tyvek, LED strip, brass fasteners, brass and paracord hanger
2013
Tyvek Dolphin Lantern

This piece is a four foot long dolphin, built from algorithmically generated folded tyvek cells. The cells are laser cut individually and assembled using split-pin brass fasteners. (Tyvek is a paperlike material made from polyethylene fibers. It’s waterproof, with incredible tensile strength. It also diffuses light beautifully). The resulting sculpture is lit from within by an RGB LED strip. This allows the lantern to glow in any color or shade, to match the mood of the gallery. It can also be programmed to oscillate between colors.

extraterrestrial origins of pulsating stars

LED light tubes, wood, plastic, custom software and electronics
2013
extraterrestrial origins of pulsating stars

During the fall of 1967, a heated debate over whether man had finally received contact from another civilization ensued. Not until the next year was another signal discovered and determined to be a rotating, radiating neutron star, spinning at a regular interval. When this radiation is detected by radio telescopes on Earth the pulsing is heard as a frequency or musical tone.

Extraterrestrial origins of pulsating stars examines the timings of 96 rotating pulsars as light and sound. The abstracted screen displays either single stars as a pulsing wave or clusters of stars, creating a cacophony of visual and sonic noise. 

The distant movement of these stars creates a visceral, sensory experience for the audience. Radiation to sound, sound to light, light to sensation.

Schrödinger

LEDs, copper, plexiglas, wood, and fur
2013
Schrödinger

Schrödinger is a study in frustrated observation. In as much as the contents reference the original quantum mechanical thought experiment of Schrödinger’s Cat*, this is intended to complement the observational paradox of the piece as a whole and my musing on the experiential roll of art. In sum, there is nothing to see here. The closer you inspect the piece, the lower the lights will fall and your reflection will obscure the contents.

* Featuring a cat who may or may not have suffered death as a result of external observation. 

efuller.net/schrodinger

“Come Closer”

Proximity sensor and computer-controlled video, length indefinite
2012
“Come Closer”

In this sensor-linked interactive video, a character on a small screen pleads with and taunts visitors as they move through the surrounding space. The proximity sensor triggers the character to give one of fourteen canned monologues depending on whether people are moving closer or farther away from the screen. When the room is empty, the character calls out “is anyone there?” When visitors enter, the character urges them to come closer, yet when visitors approach, the character becomes upset and tells them to back away. He apologizes and begs them to return. This cycle and its various permutations continue indefinitely.

The interaction aims to amuse and frustrate, recreating communication disconnects that occur in real life and when technology replaces human interaction. The character is never satisfied; he is needy and lonely if the viewer is far away, defensive and claustrophobic if the viewer is too close. Yet despite his strong emotions, the character is clearly not a “real person.” The repetition, jumpy editing cuts and Max Headroom-like aesthetic—the character wears a suit and a bald cap in front of a green screen—emphasize the artificiality of the preprogrammed responses and point to everyday corollaries such as phone trees and GPS devices. As technology becomes more sophisticated, it becomes more humanlike. This irony/dichotomy is the content and form of this project. 

Mortality Shmortality

oatmeal box, paper, glue, led light and video-player
2010 - 2012
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]

A diorama that has the illusion of little characters moving around inside it: a scientist presses a button on a giant ray-gun that brings to life a monster on a slab.  When the monster awakes the overjoyed scientist comes down from his machine to greet him but the monster tries to kill him. The scientist narrowly escapes out the doorway.  The monster then looks longingly back at the slab and goes to lie back down. As soon as he goes lifeless the scientist reemerges at the controls and turns the ray gun back on starting the entire loop over.  The whole scenario lasts about 1 minute.

Wonderlust

Polymer clay, acrylic mirror, acrylic panels, proximity detectors, LEDs, pager motors, ultrasonic water foggers, H0 scale figures
2012
Wonderlust
Wonderlust - detail

Wonderlust is a glittering, mysterious, miniature cavern. The floor of the cavern is colonised by vague organic shapes shrouded in a gently moving mist. From the ceiling of the cavern hang a cluster of immaculate mirrored rectangular bars of varying lengths. Bright lights shine shine up from the floor but are dimmed by the mists. Visitors notice the resemblance of the suspended bars to data representations like histograms. The column lengths suggest a measurement of an aspect of the shapes found directly below them. As visitors approach the piece, their curious examination triggers movement of tiny observers contemplating their environment. As they spin, the observers kick up the mists both hiding and revealing aspects of the cavern.

The piece suggests a dialog between Nature and one of the ways in which we attempt to understand it - scientific study. Do we diminish the subject by reducing it to numbers? Does the abstraction really reveal anything more? Is wonder lost or gained when we try to satisfy our curiosities?

This piece is part of a series of works I have made exploring the value we place in scientific discovery and what consequences such reverence might have for making progress - either in deepening and elaborating a paradigm or shifting to a new one. Previous works show data and models rendered either verbatim or abstractly in gild, glitter and rhinestones while all other explanatory information is lost.

The Big Dripper

eight oscillating pumps, tubing, sink, wood, steel, UV LEDs, Arduino Pro microcontrollers, electronics, water, fluorescein dye
2011
Artwork by [user-name]

The Big Dripper is a concept based on Harold Edgerton's Piddler. Edgerton's Piddler, also known as a "Time Fountain", uses a stroboscopic light source to highlight individual drops of water in a constant stream of liquid. With the strobe off, the stream looks like a solid cylinder of falling water. With the strobe on, and correctly synchronized with the actuation of the pump, the individual drips of water that compose the stream are exposed. The drips appear to hang in space as if frozen in time. By modulating the phase relationship between the frequency of the pump and the frequency of the strobe, the device can generate optical illusions of motion. For example, the individual drops can appear to fall slowly, or even crawl upwards.

The Big Dripper was featured on Hack A Day!

http://hackaday.com/2011/03/11/water-droplet-sculpture-using-leds-and-arduino/

exciter

LEDs, paint, sand on canvas; custom electronics and software
2009
Artwork by [user-name]

Exciter excites - two small forms tickle their large friend. After long effort finally all are in sync and energy flows, only to fail, break down and start again. What is the scale of this? Where is this occurring? Why do they fail so often?
There are two related ideas at play in exciter. The first is a formal idea involving the intersection of an organic gestural form described by hand-drawn marks in paint and sand, contrasted with a more formal, geometric idealization of that form through a carefully plotted patterns of LEDs. The two representations overlay and interrupt each other. A question of precedence is implied: which came first, either in construction or conception? Is one a truer representation than the other? Is one more "real" than the other?
The other idea explores the nature of the form itself. How is this form read? The gestural representation of the form contains its own cues for reading: the specificity of the marks which guide the eye, the relation of the form to the picture plane and boundaries, the trace energy of the hand left in the materials - this is the language in which paintings are read. Overlaid on this is a programmatic reading or articulation of the form through the code which controls the LEDs. The programmed LEDs destroy any concept of a picture plane and assert a totally different kind of formal space and intention. They also have the effect, in a subtle way, of making the viewer more passive, more expectant of a 'show', a spectacle or a result. The LEDs are assertive and dominant but also dependant on the surface in which they are embedded. They claim the space of intention and meaning but can they hold it against the physical image in which they reside.
In this piece I am attempting to play with these tensions - physical vs electronic representation, active vs passive viewing, the virtual space of painting vs a 'new media' virtual space - in order to explore the boundaries in between.

Search
User login
Latest Blob Posts
COLLISIONcollusion
Syndicate
Syndicate content